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Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman is president of the Children's Defense Fund. For more information go to www.childrensdefense.org



Recent Stories

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Children and the opioid crisis

President Trump’s announcement yesterday reminded us all that the opioid crisis is a public health emergency, but in fact it is also a national emergency and we must do so much more.

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Congress is holding CHIP and children hostage

Dr. Lanre Falusi knows firsthand the anxiety families face when the future of their child’s health insurance is in jeopardy.

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An urgent call for more aid and fair treatment for Puerto Rico

A National Public Radio story this week described a visit to Escuela Gaspar Vila Mayans, a public elementary school in the Rio Piedras neighborhood of San Juan, Puerto Rico: “‘PRESENTE!!!’ about 40 kids shout on cue — they’re the ones who are able to be present. More than three quarters of the student body isn’t here.

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The moment we have waited for

Rev. C.T. Vivian, legendary civil rights leader, believes young people today are inheriting the world at a unique crossroads in history and that “this is the moment we have waited for. When I say ‘we’ve’ waited for, I’m talking about humankind has waited for. I’m talking about all the great philosophers and thinkers have waited for this moment. We have lived like we have lived, blowing each other up, killing each other, stealing from each other, making a world that is not fit for human beings — we have lived that way because it’s been allowed to be.”

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Helping children cope with crisis

Executive Director of the Connecticut Commission on Children Elaine Zimmerman helps meet many child needs in her state including sharing advice to help children cope with terrible events.

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Teaching the truth about America’s history

Were my African ancestors, who were stolen at gunpoint from their homes and families, dragged in chains into the dark and crowded cargo hulls of ships for the often-fatal Middle Passage, and brutalized, beaten, and forced into chattel slavery for generations, just like many of the other “immigrants” who came to America in order to “work”?

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Learning through loss to beat the odds

Elijah Iqbal-Scott has seen a lot of sadness and sorrow in his 17 years.

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How to help young men channel rage

The recent spotlight on systematic racial profiling and police brutality against Black boys and men has exposed a painful truth long known in the Black community: just about every Black youth and man seems to have a story about being stopped by the police, and all live daily with the understanding it can happen to any of them at any time.

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Ten Rules to help black boys survive

Democracy cannot breathe, and will die, if those enjoined to protect and uphold the law snuff it out unjustly and without consequence.

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What Do We Do After Charleston?

I am a native South Carolinian. Charleston is my maternal ancestral home. My great grandmother was born during slavery. My great grandfather I have been told was a plantation overseer. Never have I been more proud and more ashamed of my dueling ancestral heritages than in the aftermath of the terroristic murders of nine Black Christians.

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