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This photo shows a sign for the town of Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. A group is trying to put up a memorial in the town to decorated African-American World War II veteran Sgt. Isaac Woodard, who was beaten and blinded by a white police chief in Batesburg-Leesville in 1946. The brutality inflicted against Woodard by a Southern police chief is credited with inspiring President Harry Truman to integrate the military in 1948. (AP Photo/Christina L. Myers)

This photo shows a sign for the town of Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. A group is trying to put up a memorial in the town to decorated African-American World War II veteran Sgt. Isaac Woodard, who was beaten and blinded by a white police chief in Batesburg-Leesville in 1946. The brutality inflicted against Woodard by a Southern police chief is credited with inspiring President Harry Truman to integrate the military in 1948. (AP Photo/Christina L. Myers)

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Civil Rights Historians tell little known story of WWII vet

Hours after leaving military service behind in 1946, a decorated African-American World War II veteran still wearing his uniform was removed from a Greyhound bus while heading home, beaten by a white South Carolina police chief and left permanently blind.