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In this Nov. 6, 2014, file photo, Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, laugh as they tell a story about collecting a piece in the exhibit "Conversations: African and African-American Artworks in Dialogue," at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art in Washington. Cosby was convicted of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

In this Nov. 6, 2014, file photo, Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, laugh as they tell a story about collecting a piece in the exhibit "Conversations: African and African-American Artworks in Dialogue," at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art in Washington. Cosby was convicted of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

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Cosby verdict met with conflicting emotions by some blacks

It is difficult to overstate the pride, admiration and sense of ownership many black Americans felt watching Bill Cosby at the height of his career in the 1980s and '90s.