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Cosby accuser makes first public statements since trial

Associated Press | 6/1/2018, 6:30 a.m.
The woman whose allegations that Bill Cosby drugged and assaulted her led to his conviction said the pills he gave ...
In this June 16, 2017 file photo, accuser Andrea Constand exits the courtroom during deliberations in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa. Constand, 44, managed the women’s basketball team at Cosby's alma mater, Temple University. She met Cosby there in 2002 and said he drugged and molested her in early 2004. (Lucas Jackson/Pool Photo via AP, File)

PHILADELPHIA — The woman whose allegations that Bill Cosby drugged and assaulted her led to his conviction said the pills he gave her made her feel like a "limp noodle," leaving her helpless to fend off the 2004 attack.

Andrea Constand, 45, a former Temple University women's basketball administrator, spoke to NBC News in her first interview since the jury convicted "The Cosby Show" star of three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

Her comments closely tracked what she said on the witness stand at Cosby's two trials — the first ended in a hung jury last summer — as she described how Cosby knocked her out with three blue pills he called "your friends," then attacked her at his suburban Philadelphia home.

"My mind is saying, 'Move your hands. Kick. Can you do anything? I don't want this.  Why is this person doing this?' And me not being able to react in any specific way," Constand said in the taped interview, a brief clip of which aired on NBC's "Today" show on Thursday. "So I was limp. I was a limp noodle."

She added: "I was crying out inside, in my throat, in my mind, for this to stop. And I couldn't do anything."

Constand said she felt ashamed and didn't immediately tell anyone about the assault because she thought no one would believe it.

NBC's full interview with Constand is due to air Friday night on the network's "Dateline" show.

Cosby is confined to his home awaiting sentencing Sept. 24. The comedian, who turns 81 in July, is likely to face a sentence of five to 10 years in prison.

Cosby has maintained his innocence, saying his sexual encounter with Constand was consensual. His lawyers attacked Constand at the April retrial as a "con artist" who framed Cosby in order to extort a huge civil settlement from him. Constand sued Cosby after prosecutors initially declined to file charges, settling with him for nearly $3.4 million over a decade ago. -- (AP)