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Honore’ slams Trump administration’s response to Puerto Rico

Glenn Townes | 10/19/2017, 6:17 p.m.
Lt. General Russel Honore', the decorated military man and Hurricane Katrina commander, recently slammed President Donald Trump for his lethargic ...
Lt. General Russel Honore'

Lt. General Russel Honore', the decorated military man and Hurricane Katrina commander, recently slammed President Donald Trump for his lethargic and sluggish approach to hurricane relief efforts in the storm ravaged island of Puerto Rico.

For Honore' who was honored by the African American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey (AACCNJ) last year and was interviewed by the South Jersey Journal, the crisis in Puerto Rico is yet another blatant example of an administration that is remiss in addressing the critical needs of the poor and less fortunate. Honore' said the crisis in Puerto Rico is yet another blatant example of poor and inept leadership from the White House. “While Trump golfs, the mayor of San Juan is living on a cot,” he said. “The president has shown again you don't give a damn about poor people.”

Honore' emerged as a national hero with his leadership and command of recovery efforts in New Orleans in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina. When asked if Hurricane Maria was worse than what he faced during Katrina, Honore' said, “Oh, hell yeah!” During an interview with CNN, Honore' said, “The number one priority is saving lives and when you're saving lives, you've gotta figure out what rules you're gonna break.” Hurricane Maria battered the island of Puerto Rico on September 20th.

According to the most recent figures available, at least 34 people have died and more than 75 percent of the once tropical island is still without power and clean water—nearly three weeks after the storm hit. Current preliminary damage estimates to repair and rebuild the island tops approximately $91 billion.

Lastly, Honore' said leadership is the art and science of influencing others to willingly follow your direction—the key word is willingly. “If you want followers to follow wholeheartedly, you have to give them something to aspire to,” he said. In his book, Leadership in the New Normal, published in 2012 Honore' predicted that future disasters would occur and poor people will bear the brunt of the suffering and loss. However, he writes, “We shouldn't expect government, or any institution, to keep us safe. A lot of times they do, but sometimes they don't. We have to be prepared to be our own first responders.”