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Hillary Clinton makes history at Democratic National Convention

Clinton becomes the first woman to accept a major party’s nomination for U.S. president

Journal Staff Report | 7/29/2016, 6:53 a.m.
After three days of talking about Hillary Clinton, the Democrats inside the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia and those watching ...
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks on the fourth and last day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on July 27.

After three days of talking about Hillary Clinton, the Democrats inside the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia and those watching at home finally had an opportunity to hear from the woman herself on Thursday night, as she accepted the party’s nomination for President of the United States.

The theme for Thursday night was “Stronger Together,” to emphasize that the Democrats are stronger together when Democrats coalesce around the party’s nominee. The theme was also aimed at countering Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s message, which is seen by many as divisive.

Clinton was introduced by her daughter Chelsea who sought to build on the job that her father, former president Bill Clinton, did on Tuesday of humanizing her mother.

Earlier retired Gen. John Allen gave an impassioned defense of Clinton which sought to bolster her national security credentials. There were also several speeches from non-politicians.

All of that was a buildup to Clinton’s speech — the first presidential acceptance address delivered by a woman.

Clinton presented an optimistic vision for the future in her acceptance speech Thursday.

The former Secretary of State focused on national security: “America is once again at a moment of reckoning. Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart. Bonds of trust and respect are fraying. And just as with our founders there are no guarantees. It’s truly is up to us. We have to decide whether we’re going to work together so we can all rise together.”

We are clear-eyed about what our country is up against. But we are not afraid. We will rise to the challenge, just as we always have.”

Clinton said as president she will focus on helping American workers who are struggling: “So I want to tell you tonight how we’re going to empower all Americans to live better lives. My primary mission as President will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States. From my first day in office to my last. Especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind. From our inner cities to our small towns, Indian Country to Coal Country. From the industrial Midwest to the Mississippi Delta to the Rio Grande Valley.

Clinton also focused on national security and domestic terrorism: “The choice we face is just as stark when it comes to our national security. Anyone reading the news can see the threats and turbulence we face. From Baghdad and Kabul, to Nice and Paris and Brussels, to San Bernardino and Orlando, we’re dealing with determined enemies that must be defeated. No wonder people are anxious and looking for reassurance — looking for steady leadership.”

The Democratic presidential candidate presented herself as a strong and steady leader: “Every generation of Americans has come together to make our country freer, fairer, and stronger. None of us can do it alone. That’s why we are stronger together.”